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    Masterofoneinchpunch

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    Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Masterofoneinchpunch on Fri Jul 22, 2011 3:09 pm

    Share your reviews, comments and discussions of commentaries and/or supplemental materials for movies.

    In the spirit of organization and learning, I felt a new thread for this could be beneficial (well at least for me as I know where to find particular discussions).

    I'll start by moving some thread material and notes I had elsewhere -- again.
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    Masterofoneinchpunch

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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Masterofoneinchpunch on Fri Jul 22, 2011 3:10 pm

    God of Gamblers R0 Widescreen Mei Ah

    Interview of Director (Wong Jing) (6.14m w/removable English subs)

    Origin of God of Gambler
    Name founded by Jimmy Heung, read a book, character was a ghost, states it was badly written.

    The Most Unforgettable Scene:
    First saw brother lung Fong after waking up [spelt Chau Yun Fat in subs]

    In the eyes of gambling movies godfather Jeff Lau:
    Enjoyed Jeff Lau’s All For The Winner (states created Stephen Chow; [while that film was a bonified smash Chow was doing decent with a few minor hits that year such as Curry and Pepper and My Hero]); says few know how to make a gambling film, later Wong worked with Chow in sequels; won’t give a glance to other gambling films. [I just bought All For The Winner so I look forward to wwatching it; it seems God of Gamblers 2 is a sequel to that film]

    Best Actor Chow Yun Fat [spelt correctly now]
    Chow doesn’t gamble.
    Knew him over 20 years; knows him as much as John Woo, Ringo Lam, Johnnie To; knew him since he first started acting. [seems a bit jealous]

    From the aspect of Wong Jing

    Between Ideal and Reality
    Crying Heart (2000; did not get directors salary for), will make movies he likes [he means he will do films that are not necessarily popular]

    The Meaning of Awards
    Never thinks about it, but will not refuse an award.

    Style of Future Movies
    Makes comedy/drama 2/3s of the time. The other 1/3 is made for black comedies. In 1998 made “A True Mob Story” and later “Crying Heart”. “Casino Raiders” made before, same with “God of Gamblers” and “Casino Tycoon.”

    The Afterlife of Colour of the Truth [this movie came out in 2003 which dates this interview]
    Show scenes [looks cool]
    Planning to make sequel at the end of the year [Colour of the Loyalty would be made(?)/released in 2005]
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    Masterofoneinchpunch

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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Masterofoneinchpunch on Fri Jul 22, 2011 3:11 pm

    Ong Bak 2 R1 Magnet 2-Disc

    Disc 1:
    Behind the Scenes: Capturing a Warrior (4m52s no subs)
    Shows behind the scenes with a few injuries.
    HDNet: A look at Ong Bak 2 (2m54s, no subs, English)
    Robert Wilonsky – Film Critic, Village Voice Media Chain
    Says Casino Royale beginning homage to Ong Bak [still haven’t seen Casino Royale]
    OB2 set in 1431
    reminds him of Bruce Lee in 1970s where young novice brought into den of thieves taught how to be a fighter, an assassin, a main, it is the plot of every great kung fu movie ever made all the way from Bruce Lee to Kung Fu PandaSays the movie has no special effects
    [this guy doesn’t know what he is talking about; how do these guys get movie jobs]
    Ong Bak 3: Exclusive Footage (1m34s)
    Basically a trailer

    Disc 2:
    The Making of Ong Bak 2 – The Story and Characters of an Epic (7m27s Thai w/ removable English subtitles)
    Prachya Pinkaew: stated they had to top Ong Bak and Tom Yum Koong)
    Tony Jaa: wanted to combine martial arts from several countries into one.
    Panna Rittikrai – haven’t seen Jet Li or Jackie Chan do this.
    Ek Iamchuen (writer/designer): Focused on early Ayothaya (Ayutthaya Kingdom) when Thais invaded Khmer, Khmer setting; Thai movie happened in “Khmer Land” [I don’t see him listed on IMDB for this film; he has good info though]
    TJ: took an extra acting course, studied character deeply: “There is no foreigner in this movie at all” all Thai actors.
    Other interviews that mainly went over character and plot.
    The Making of Ong Bak 2 – Revealing the Majesty (6m37s Thai w/removable English subtitles)
    Mostly repetition of things said before.
    Panna Rittikrai: about 50 elephants were used in main Elephant scene. [It is a little annoying when he brings up Jackie Chan again.] “Jackie did it as an act, but Tony did it real. It’s real, the hurt is real.”
    The Making of Ong Bak 2 – The Art of War (7m01s Thai w/removable English subtitles)
    PR: says first time for Tony using weapons
    PR: “It definitely makes us prouder than Ong Bak 1 and Tom Yum Koong”

    Behind the Scenes: The Kingdom (6m26s Thai no subs)
    Behind the Scenes: The Community (6m31s Thai no subs)
    Mostly BTS and repetition of what has been seen

    Interviews with Case and Crew (Thai w/removable English subtitles)
    Tony Jaa: (codirector/Tien) 6m18s
    Integrate Khon/ martial arts and weapon fighting; had many acting challenges. Most difficult scene was final scene in the raider’s village. Dan Chupong studied MA with him.
    Prachya Pinkaew (Producer) 5m37s
    Says Tony avoided acting and emotion in previous 2 films because his actding wasn’t convincing for people. Learned acting from Professor Aaew; Khon drama from Professor Chet; lots of sets used; live crocodile mixed with mechanical; Likes Jackie Chan in Drunken Master, talks about different drunk technique used in film.
    Sorapong Chatree (Chernang) 1m10s
    Santisuk Phromsii (Lord Sihadecho) 1m09s
    Sarunyu Wongkrachang (Lord Rajasena) 1m25s
    Nirut Sirichanya (Master Bua) 1m43s
    Primorata Dejudom (Pim) 2m15s
    These interviews mainly went over character and plot.
    [Name spellings are different on discs than on IMDB. I used IMDB for several here.]

    International Trailer 3m50s
    U.S. Trailer 1m38s
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    Masterofoneinchpunch

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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Masterofoneinchpunch on Thu Aug 18, 2011 2:25 pm

    Tears of the Black Dragon R1 Magnolia
    Starts with trailers The Host, Severance, HDNet commercial

    Making of TEARS OF THE BLACK TIGER -- Thai w/removable English subtitles (45m21s)

    Thai TV Channel 3
    hosted by Amarin Nitipol
    interviews Adirek Wattaleela (executive producer), Nonzee Nimibutr (producer), Wisit Sananatieng (screenwriter, director).
    After Dang Bireley And The Young Gangsters this was the next project
    Wanted to combine old style films with comedy and modern techniques.
    Stopped to do Nang Nak and then went back to working on Tears.
    Wisit Had to do storyboards to get point of film across. Adirek was initially against Tears.
    “Fah talai jone” (Thai Herbal Medicine): WS: used it because it is a story about destiny
    “When The Rain Bid The Sky Farewell” (main song in the film): old fashioned song.
    the novel “Tears of the Black Tiger” by Sor Jindawong is based on the script put in a monthly magazine. A radio play was released later as well.
    Shows Wisit’s Wrangler Jeans commercial [the link is awesome] [you can see similarities to the movie especially in the backdrops of one of the commercials but I can't find that one I am looking for; here is another Thai jeans commercial]
    NN: After shooting transferred negative to Digital Betacam tape, rework color. Oxide Pang [part of Pang Brothers: The Eye, Bangkock Dangerous] taught them this trick.
    Oxide Pang: Adjust color using Da Vinci; had to use computer; possibly first time done on a Thai film (had been done for Thai commercials)
    NN: had to deliver film to Australia to transfer film back to 35mm
    AN: says movie was shot in black and white and then colored.
    Ek Lemchuen (production design): period and clothes is retro style of old Thai movies. Takes place after WWII. Did research using Thai National Film Archive
    Wisit wanted all the movie to be non-realistic Very Happy
    Veera Bamsungsi sung song by Leud Prasomsap, wanted old song but sound quality was bad.
    Unknown (sound guy)
    AN now talks to Cast: Stella Malucchi (Rumpoey), Chartchai Ngamsan (Dum), Arawat Ruangvuth (Captain Kumjorn).
    WS describes why he cast these actors:
    Big fan of Chana Sri-ubon (hero from past) says Chartchai is similar. Says many past leading heroines were mixed race: Indian-Thai actress look was very popular. Found Stella in a music video. Favorite past actress was Ruttanawadee Ruttanapun. WS says Stella looked like her.
    Stella is actually Italian-Columbian. No Thai. Been living there for 18 years.
    Chartchai been working with WS since Wrangler commercials. Did 2499 (1998) then this film.
    Arawat’s first film.
    Stella had to learn traditional Thai (not the language she uses everday) [Not sure what Jon Jai is meant by?]
    Supakorn Kitsuwon (Mahesuan Tiger) in a prerecorded clip [no his real voice is not like in the film]: learning to ride a horse was difficult: “My bum hurt every time I rode the horse.” [yes either an Australian or English person did the translation] Had to get used to the 45mm weapon. Had to chew tobacco
    Post production talk.
    What others think about the film. [normal over positive feedback]
    Actors now praising film [though it is interesting to hear them say give Thai film a chance over international one which is an issue among many Southeast Asian countries.]
    Last five minutes is scenes and behind the scenes.
    Theatrical Trailer (2m28s)

    Legend of the Fist: The Return of Chen Zhen R1 Well Go

    Starts off with trailers: The King of Fighters, Little Big Soldier, Ip Man 2, The Man From Nowhere
    Trailers: Theatrical Trailer (2m17s w removable English subs), International Trailer (1m10s no subs)
    Behind the Scenes:
    Battle Field(7m57s Cantonese w removable English subs):
    Normal type of BtS until Donnie Yen hurts his knee doing a side kick. Seems to be OK afterwords.
    Night Club (9m33s Cantonese/Mandarin/Japanese/English no subs then later the subs kick in for I think the Cantonese speaking only)
    Worth seeing just for Donnie Yen playing the piano (a ragtime piece). That man can do anything. “People in the back, look happy, act happy.”

    A Hero Never Dies R0 Universe

    Stars’ Files: English/Chinese Biographies/Filmographies on Leon Lai, Sean Lau, Yoyo Mong, Johnnie To, Wai Ka Fai.
    More Attractions: Trailers for Extreme Crisis, Enter the Eagles, City of Glass
    Interview: Yo Yo Mong [aka Yoyo Mung Ka-wai]:
    “Do you like the movie “A HERO NEVER DIE”?
    (19s Cantonese w/removable English/Chinese subs) Apparently she likes the movie but especially likes enemies turning into friends. Thinks feeling scenes more important than action scenes.
    “In your opinion, do you think the part on facial distortion is necessary in the movie?”
    (13s Cantonese w/removable English/Chinese subs) Yes.
    “In reality, if you meet a man like Leon in “A HERO NEVER DIE”, will you stay with him in all circumstances without any regret?
    (21s Cantonese w/removable English/Chinese subs) No. To much violence.
    “As a newcomer, how much Johnnie To has helped your career development?”
    (46s Cantonese w/removable English/Chinese subs) Descibes acting experience with To where she had to show pain.
    NG Footage: 3m10s: some random scenes set to music.
    Trailer: 3m22s
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    Masterofoneinchpunch

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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Masterofoneinchpunch on Thu Sep 08, 2011 5:02 pm

    Brian I think you are going to love this. I'm going to put the quote I found on top. What do you guys think? (of course you can read through the rest of the notes)

    Jackie Chan: “Nowadays, there is no distinction between Hong Kong There is no “Mainland cinema”. And Mainland China films. There’s only one kind of films: Chinese films. It’s unified.”

    Little Big Soldier R1 Well Go
    Trailers From Start: Legend of the Fist Chen Zhen, Kung Fu Dunk, Ip Man 2.

    Trailer: 2m03s
    International Trailer: 1:39
    Jackie Chan Music Video Rape Flowers (Lyrics: Ding Sheng, Ziao Ke; Composer: Ziao Ke) 3m09s Mandarin w/English subs
    Here is the video
    [doesn’t seem to come in that good; scenes of film intercut with Jackie singing]
    [rape flowers sounds better in Mandarin; check out this link: http://roryinchina.wordpress.com/2011/04/10/the-what-flowers-rape-flowers/]

    Making Of (14m05s; Mandarin w/removable English subs)
    JC Group presents this:
    [also seems a little blurry] use of wires seen
    WL: Wang Leehom’s first costume film who is also a musician and producer.
    JC: great things to say about WL.
    [great; they have interviewees who are not given names; though I recognize Lin Peng and Zu Dong-Mei the two female leads and Ding Sheng the director]
    we learn (though we already know) that JC is involved in all aspects.
    Mount Liang (JC character’s house is below)
    film is anti-war
    set during warring states
    DS: JC personally cast Wang Leehom for role.
    DS would use storyboards.
    [Two interviewees speaking English]
    JC: [he states that he was leading the director and then says he gives him full reign]
    DS: JC came up with idea 20 years earlier.
    JC: “Nowadays, there is no distinction between Hong Kong There is no “Mainland cinema”. And Mainland China films. There’s only one kind of films: Chinese films. It’s unified.”
    [oh my; does he include Taiwan films here too]


    Last edited by Masterofoneinchpunch on Fri Mar 09, 2012 5:26 pm; edited 2 times in total (Reason for editing : Added video link)
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    Brian T

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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Brian T on Fri Sep 09, 2011 1:15 am

    Masterofoneinchpunch wrote:Brian I think you are going to love this. I'm going to put the quote I found on top. What do you guys think? (of course you can read through the rest of the notes)

    Jackie Chan: “Nowadays, there is no distinction between Hong Kong There is no “Mainland cinema”. And Mainland China films. There’s only one kind of films: Chinese films. It’s unified.”

    He'd like that, I'll bet. After all, he did once say that all Chinese people needed to be "controlled" by the government, so one presumes he was including the citizens of the former colony in which he made his fame and fortune.

    Seriously, what a ridiculous, ass-kissy thing to say. He (and others) may hold some misty-eyed conception of all Chinese people everywhere as one big happy homogenous family, but to do that is to deny the altogether unique culture and character of Hong Kong's Chinese population (and possibly Taiwan's, not to mention the diaspora), which is easily as strong as any thinned-out blood ties the mainland might point up.

    Mainland movies and Hong Kong movies -- even many of the ones produced with partial capital from the mainland -- are a million miles apart. They just happen to feature similar-looking people by default. Wink


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    Masterofoneinchpunch

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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Masterofoneinchpunch on Tue Sep 13, 2011 10:46 am

    Curse of the Golden Flower Sony Picture Classics R1
    Trailers at beginning: Black Book, Volver

    Secrets Within… (21m52s English w no subs/ Mandarin with non-removable subs)
    Zhang Yimou: “Gold and jade on the outside, rot and decay on the inside.”
    Shows behind the scenes as well as movie scenes
    Chow Yun Fat: (speaks in English; some Cantonese later)
    Tang Dynasty; feudalism; when men dominated society
    CYF: character good father, good king, wanted to work with director and liked Gong Li
    Gong Li:
    ZY: empress suffers the most.
    Jay Chou (Prince Jie): “Xiao” (filial piety)
    This is Jay Chou’s second film after transition from pop singer to actor [Initial D is first]
    Production began in early 2006; at Beijing Studios.
    Huo Tingxiao (Production Designer): pillars illuminated from the inside.
    Yee Chung Man (Costume Designer):
    ZY: focus on the color gold. Each actor is dressed in layers, up to six.
    Dragon is the key symbol; phoenix is the theme.
    ZY: all the outfits done by hand. Some costumes weighed more than 40 kils (60 lbs).
    Tony Ching Siu Tong (Action Director): Action in the film is realistic, story is not a fantasy.
    Largest set ever built in China. 20 days and over 1000 soldiers for battle sequence.
    Chinese title: “Golden Armor Fills the City”
    GL: doesn’t think ZY has changed a bit since they last worked together (Shanghai Triad 1995) Movies are his great love.
    CYF: biggest challenge for him was the Mandarin dialogue.
    nearly six months of filming and six months of post-production
    Narrator is Beau Weaver

    Los Angeles Premiere (2m30s)
    AFI Fest November 12, 2006
    Zhang Yimou (Mandarin w removable English subs and someone speaking English repeating what he says) Adapted from a stage play from the 20’s and 30s called Thunderstorm
    Tang dynasty
    Chow Yun Fat (English): Never played a Chinese King before. [he has played a Siamese King]
    Gong Li (Mandarin)

    Previews:
    Offside, The Italian, Black Book, House of Flying Daggers, Kung Fu Hustle, Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon, Volver, Riding Alone For Thousands of Miles, American Hardcore, The Quiet

    Exiled Magnet R1
    Trailers at beginning: Moving McAllister, Weirdsville, Mr. Untouchable, HDNet Commercial

    Making of “Exiled” (12m01s: Cantonese w/non-removable English subs)
    Plot/character description with most of the cast and director mixed with behind the scenes footage and actual footage.
    Had a lot of fun making this.
    Fire scene with actor annoyed him (shows scenes of him being set on fire; this is also in the Behind the Scenes footage).
    JT: There wasn’t any script (at least not shown to actors); acting was improvised
    JT: (talks about making of) “The director himself didn’t know what he was doing.”
    JT: Looked through the eyes of a romantic idealist.
    JT: says he hopes his film is not too local.

    Behind the Scenes (6m20s no subs except for film footage)

    HDNet Films Sneak-Peek: “Redacted” (4m56s)

    The Wedding Banquet R1 MGM

    “A Forbidden Passion” Featurette with Director/Co-writer Ang Lee and Producer/Co-writer James Schamus (19m34s English no subtitles except for movie scenes)
    AL: father is high school principal. Made agreement with father to get degree. 15 years of struggle till he made his first movie. Even when in school in US wanted to make Chinese film.
    wrote Wedding Banquet six years before it was made.
    first half story of Neil Peng (writer) friend.
    TS: talks about his specialization with Ted Hope on funding “low budget”
    AL: praise for TS and TH.
    AL: Pushing Hands was a hit helped get him money for the film he really wanted to make in Wedding Banquet.
    screwball comedy with gay and Chinese.
    Both (TS, AL) were married at City Hall.
    AL: Parents dialogue was from his parents and his responses.
    AL: Had problem casting known actor.
    AL: Winston Chao (Gao Wai-tung) never acted before [he has been acting since with latest film being 1911 (2011)]
    TS: says first boy on boy kiss in Taiwanese cinema.
    AL: worked with Sihung Lung in Pushing Hands.
    TS: Sihung Lung is heart and soul of the movie.
    AL: first three films actually a trilogy about my father.
    AL: father came from China, ran away from civil war, is first son. His parents were executed. Tremendous guilt from working as an entertainer.
    AL: low budget films much free-er for him.

    Theatrical Trailer (1m17s)
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    Masterofoneinchpunch

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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Masterofoneinchpunch on Tue Sep 20, 2011 9:49 am

    The Warrior From Shaolin (Tai Seng):

    Ric Meyer's commentaries are a mixed bag. You get a very enthusiastic person who is self-deprecating who spouts sometimes misleading or just plain wrong information in his commentaries. To be fair the commentary for this movie was done in 2000 where information was not as easy to come by and Meyer's was slowing improving in how to deliver his information (this is better than the one he did for Shaolin Drunken Monk). Normally I would take notes on commentaries, but I was tired and he makes enough mistakes that it does get a little tiring. Plus he doesn't usually put too much information that you can't find from looking at HKMDB and this one did not have any in depth information about the filming.

    Various and Sundry Comments:
    His constant mentioning of all the different names for several of the actors like Gordon Liu got a little annoying. He mostly stuck with the Mandarin pronunciation of them, but as he stated himself he is not good at pronouncing the names correctly.
    Most likely the movie was made to make extra money for the Lau brothers in between shoots for the Shaw Brothers.
    His comments on working for Ocean Shores is quite interesting and the best part of the commentary. He put together a couple of compilations of Kung Fu for them (one of them I think is THIS IS KUNG FU), but was set up in the middle of a factory to do it and had to personally tell the employees to be quiet in order to get his work done. He still feels bad about it.
    He talked quite a bit about the filmographies of the Lau family throughout the movie as well as Lily Li and a few others.
    Talked about obvious plot holes in the film. [I agree with him that much of the movie, especially the hopping vampires segment, was added as filler]
    I find it hilarious that Ric doesn't know when someone is being doubled. He literally thinks that Gordon Liu is doing all his acrobatics, splits etc... I don't think he knows that Gordon is not actually an adopted brother to the Lau brothers.

    I would recommend for most to avoid this commentary (and possibly the movie as well Smile).

    Fists and Guts (1979: Tai Seng) Hong Kong commentary by Ric Meyers (2000)
    If you have heard The Warrior From Shaolin commentary many of the stories here are the same. I remember him doing a lot of the same stories in The Shaolin Drunken Monk as well (all part of the three pack Master Killer Collection) though it has been several years since I have heard that one. This commentary was done before The Warrior From Shaolin since he mentions Fists and Guts in that commentary. Early in the commentary I was wondering if it was the same commentary as The Warrior From Shaolin since several statements are almost the same word-for-word.

    States Gordon Lau was first Shaw Brother star to take on English name before edict came down preventing the use of English names for their stars [I wonder how true this actually is].
    Talks about career of Lau Kar-wing. He Has Nothing But Kung Fu was first directing job [decent independent film]
    Berates Ocean Shores [again; rightfully so] Later states that they didn’t have a lot of respect for their videos like the use of widescreen and subtitles; goes over dubbing issues [good to here he doesn’t prefer dubbing]
    Gave opening date of film as Dec. 27, 1979 [HKMDB has it as Dec. 21, 1979; close enough]
    Talks about Beast Cops (1998) as recent.
    Says Lau Kar-wing’s first film is The Inheritor of Kung Fu (1977) [this isn’t even close; he’s been acting since 1963]
    LKW co-founded Gar Bor with Sammo Hung and Karl Maka.
    Sometimes he comes up with annoying statements like (paraphrasing) “she can open up cans with her sideburns.” Sometimes he comes up with something interesting: “You can tell the budget by the supporting casts dental work.”
    Stated Lo Lieh started work in 1968 [actually it was in 1965] and still acting today [he would die a few years after this commentary]
    States Black Magic (1975) as first HK horror film [not entirely wrong I think such films as The Killer Snakes (1974) is early, but is more sleaze; nice article on this topic: http://www.yesasia.com/us/yumcha/black-mag...ed-article.html]
    Says On The Run (1988) is a great film. [I need to see this]
    Comments that the leper scene could have been more extreme.
    Talks about meeting Lee Hoi-sang, Lo Leih (who speaks good English), Lau Kar-wing.
    He calls Chinese Ninjas mo-sha [I’m not sure where he gets that; I know they are called忍者 renzhe; argh hate when I can’t find info]
    Makes mistake that Gordon Lau does stunts when he doesn’t.
    Makes strange statement that Hitler ruined swastika and mustache [I know where he was going with the swastika since it has been around for centuries; but the mustache statement was hilarious]

    Shaolin Drunken Monk (1982: Tai Seng) Hong Kong commentary by Ric Meyers (2000)

    Kids about calling it “Greatest Martial Arts Film Ever”
    Calls it Plan Nine From Outer China
    Says made in Mainland China [I think it actually might be made in Korea; can’t find good info on this]
    Talks about Gordon Lau’s hair changing length throughout the film [it does]
    Says cheapest film master killer has done [apparently hasn’t seen Breakout From Oppression]
    Repeats Ultimate Warrior, Gordon Liu bio, Shaw Brothers English name edit stories again [also in Fists and Guts, The Warrior From Shaolin commentaries]
    [for dating purposes he does mention Lethal Weapon 4 and Shanghai Noon(2000)]
    [this commentary has many more empty stretches compared to Fists and Guts and The Warrior From Shaolin]
    States boss of Ocean Shores is (was?) Jackson Hung [no idea]
    He states that he tried to contact Shaw Brothers about their films; thinks the films are no longer in existence [obviously wrong now; he just didn’t have enough money as Celestial did]
    “solar-powered martial artists” referring to their clothes.
    [Says Gordon Lau’s Cantonese name of Lau Kar-fai was Japanese]
    [I don’t know why he keeps stating Heroes of the East as the Kramer vs. Kramer of HK; he has said this in the other commentaries as well]
    Goes over other peoples injuries in other films like Cat vs. Rat [I’m not sure who exactly got injured but the injury was apparently a broken leg that got healed by herbal medicine] and A Better Tomorrow 2 (the explosion that made Chow Yun-fat partially deaf)
    States that US films have no training sequences [has he not seen Rocky and its sequels]
    Only Gordon Lau film to have “master killer nookie” [this might be true; but this was a hilarious statement]
    I think he’s right when he states that the flashbacks contained scenes that were not in the film.
    He states that here is the place where a Mandarin film would put a song where the female would sound like Yoko Ono [he can certainly put his foot in his mouth over and over]
    Says Challenge of the Masters (1976) was Lau Kar-leung’s first directoral film [actually was The Spiritual Boxer (1975)]
    Discusses the styles of some of the fights.
    Correctly states that The Mask of Zorro (1998) referenced a training scene from Drunken Master.


    Last edited by Masterofoneinchpunch on Tue Sep 20, 2011 9:56 am; edited 2 times in total
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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Masterofoneinchpunch on Tue Sep 20, 2011 9:51 am

    The Legendary Strike (1978: Tai Seng) Hong Kong commentary by Ric Meyers (2001?)

    Normal Ric Meyers Intro
    Gives akas Fist Too Fast and Iron Maiden
    Released Nov. 30, 1978
    [throughout the commentary he overdoes biographies of everyone listed; naming off way too many movies per person; however, he is better on correct information here then in earlier commentaries though still makes some snafus which I’ll explain later as well his faux pas style of humour]
    Frankie Chan bio: Composer on this film, [I blame him for the irritating sound whenever the pearl shows up], Taekwondo expert [couldn’t verify this] talks about films he has done including directing work with JC on Armour of God [though technically he was Executive Director not co-director]
    Huang Feng bio: Director on this film; well respected, states directed first Golden Harvest film The Angry River [the first actually I believe is The Invincible Eight (1971)], states helped make Angela Mao a star [that pretty much is true; while she acted in a few early features, several films directed by Huang did help her popularity out a lot; possibly why she was in this not-so-good movie] This was his last directing job.
    Ric corrects a mistake he made in a previous commentary on The Heroes (1980) aka The Shaolin Heroes (Amazon link: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00005NTNG/ where he credited The Himalayan to King Hu instead of Huang Feng.
    [quick mention of I believe Graffon Film Co. as being founded by Huang Feng which only did The Victim according to HKMDB and IMDB]
    Many, many comments on Cassanova Wong looking like Spock.
    “Do you know how many commentaries Tai Seng makes me do in a day? This is our third one out of four?” He will not mention what the others are.
    Shaw Brothers have not released DVDs [they would in 2002]
    Ocean Shores talk: do no remastering [duh]; hardcore fans like dub and full screens
    Theorizes that American directors cut too close to the action because they grew up on Full screen versions of HK MA.
    Frank Jang at Tai Seng would translate songs, this was not done in this film; original song was kept.
    Chan Sing bio: credited for bring sai to HK; started in 1969 with Return of the One-Armed Swordsman, uses mostly upper body fighting. Started getting fatter in the 80s.
    Kam Kong bio: student of Tae Kwon Do. Stereotyped because of tall size.
    Talks about womens roles in HK cinema.
    “Chang Cheh who wasn’t that into women.” [you had to go there]
    Not sure what the Legendary Strike is [I’m not sure what it is either]
    Talks about Stoner (film with Angelo Mao) and how she spent most of the film as a dirty boy [this isn’t true; she is dirty in a few scenes, but never a boy and not most of the film]
    Talks about George Lazenby. Doing a boneheaded move is called a Lazenby [saying a faux pas in a commentary is called a Ric Meyers]
    Paul Chu bio: “Lucked out because of looks”, hasn’t worked since 2000 still hasn’t to my knowledge]
    Cassanova Wong: discovered by Sammo Hung, from Korea, Tae Kwon Do, now a film producer in South Korea …
    “You career is going down if you appear in a ninja movie or a sexy film.” [for ever several faux pas he makes he has a gem like this]
    Carter Wong: “No one can look constipated like Carter Wong.” Says other actors scoffed at his MA abililty.
    Mars: not sure why his name is Mars. [HKMDB states it is a take from a stage name he had -- Martian Monster; doesn’t say how he got the stage name]
    “Nobody can play a corpse like Mars”
    Talks about Deadful Melody commentary.
    Does not like Big Trouble in Little China because it is based on and not as good as Zu Warriors (1983) and Bastard Swordsman (1983).
    Ends the commentary a bit early.

    The Victim (1980) commentary by Ric Meyers and Bobby Samuels (2001)

    BS: worked with Sammo in 2 features; lived with Sammo 3 years; Sammo helped him in Cantonese and helped with action with camera.
    BS: Sammo written with 2 n’s [title has one]
    Curious statement from both that this was Sammo’s first directed film [his first credited film is The Iron Fisted Monk (1977)]
    BS: had to tone down acting when he got back to States.
    BS: states how Sammo got facial scar because of broken bottle in face technique.
    RM: compares camera style to Chang Cheh [I don’t see it]
    RM/BS: reiterates Sammo/Bruce Lee confrontation story [I wonder who won that one?]
    BS: Sammo lived next to Leung Kar-yan for years; helped him get into acting; states story that Leung did not know martial arts at all [would repeat this throughout commentary]
    States The Postman Strikes Back was Chow Yun-fat’s only MA role until Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon.
    BS: says you need to have 3 prolific stunt directors sign for you for stuntmen card.
    BS: Sammo idolized Bruce Lee.
    RM: notes Sammo’s obsession for nudity as well as Jackie Chan. BS says this is because they grew up together nude so it was more normal; RM points out scenes where it goes beyond normal.
    BS: was directed by Yuen Wo-ping in Red Wolf. Has great things to say about him. Says he is cigarette guy and that many smoked too much. Says only individual choreographer that has complete control of his vision.
    Many actresses from pageants.
    Chan Lung’s nickname ma goo; won’t state what it means [no idea; if anyone has the characters for his nickname please PM me]. He had problems, was institutionalized.
    [Dark Was mentioned as this year; puts the commentary around 2001]
    RM: states that Sammo’s career started with 1971 Angry River [not even close; actually his math gets a little weird when he states that sammo had worked for 32 years and Beardy at 26 years]
    BS: was not happy about Lee Hoi-sang being in blackface in Enter The Fat Dragon; Sammo could have hired a black actor. Says he could write a book about racism in the industry. He talks about difficult sequence in Don’t Give A Damn until RM breaks him off [on purpose] [this was getting interesting; I have not seen that film, but reviews do not paint it kindly; he later seems to still be upset with Sammo about particular issues dealing with race]
    RM: Sammo likes to fill his films with interesting looking characters; hypothesizes because Sammo is scarred and overweight.
    BS: Says Chang Yi is one of his favorite villains; from Indonesia [according to HKMDB he is from Huizhou, Guangdong Province], real martial artist.
    RM: white is not color of wedding it is color of death; red is color of wedding; BS agrees
    RM: Sammo knows how to move camera, says Sammo has hand on camera.
    BS: Sammo told him camera was third arm.
    BS says he has seen this about 50 times; RM says about six.
    Both talk about possible doubling including use of Chung Faat, Sammo possibly being doubled and later use of Yuen Biao [which is very obvious doubling for Wilson Tong Wai-shing].
    BS: favorite scene is Sammo versus Leung.
    RM: filmed completely on location; “worst things happen to chickens”
    BS: Sammo well over 200 pounds; Yuen Wo-ping is godfather of two of Sammo’s sons, Jackie Chan is godfather to younger son.
    RM: says fans started to turn on Sammo after Lucky Stars Go Places (1986) [I don’t quite agree with this because Eastern Condors and that film both made over 20m HK; now he didn’t direct for a few years as EC and Millionaire’s Express was a real hit unlike what he states]
    RM: started to have sexist, racist mysogonist streak [umm; has RM not seen his first directed film The Iron Fisted Monk (1977) which is very mysognositic]
    BS: Sammo well known for his gambling [Bobby definitely is still a little angry with Sammo]
    RM: pole stands up to sword, not possible [actually this is funny if you think about it]
    BS: not happy with sister (Yuet Yee) not showing emotion after her brother’s death; RM tries to explain why then gives up.
    BS: got to work with Lam Ching-ying before he died [not sure when]
    RM/BS: could not find other roles for girlfriend played by Fanny Wang [reason why she’s in four films: Fame of Chess (1977), The Victim (1980), All’s Well, End’s Well ’97 (1997) and A Decade of Love (2008) and I’m not even sure about Fame of Chess or A Decade of Love Very Happy]
    BS: Sammo love American films.
    Both: terrible scene ghost/Dracula sequence; RM: where did he get the tux? “Sammo Size” “Enter the Fat Vampire”
    RM: What year is this supposed to be? [?]
    RM: plot issue; get Mom out of room [actually this is funny] “pillage then burn, not burn than pillage”
    BS: Sammo wanted Martial Law to go on longer.
    RM: says took out Sammo from fighting in second season; took out humor, was top 20 show, TV Guide award; almost as if they wanted it to fail. [Interesting article here: http://kungfuqigong.com/ezine/article.php?article=216 ]
    BS: most difficult when you fight multiple people [unless you are Fezzik]
    [RM confuses MA audience with mainstream audience]
    BS: Sammo spoke English at end of film [can’t tell with this dub]
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    Brian T

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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Brian T on Tue Sep 20, 2011 11:06 am

    Well, I'm fairly convinced now that I don't need to listen to these commentaries (I think I have two of these titles), although I do agree with this:

    Masterofoneinchpunch wrote:Says On The Run (1988) is a great film. [I need to see this]

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    Masterofoneinchpunch wrote:BS: was not happy about Lee Hoi-sang being in blackface in Enter The Fat Dragon; Sammo could have hired a black actor. Says he could write a book about racism in the industry. He talks about difficult sequence in Don’t Give A Damn until RM breaks him off [on purpose] [this was getting interesting; I have not seen that film, but reviews do not paint it kindly; he later seems to still be upset with Sammo about particular issues dealing with race]

    Hearing more about this dark side of the industry from someone like Samuels would indeed be enlightening. Some western fans have qualified (maybe even defended) the racism in Hong Kong cinema by saying it's simply OK because of how Hollywood portrayed Asians throughout the decades, etc., and granted when one thinks of, say, Mickey Rooney in BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S (which even Blake Edwards felt ashamed of later on), or various other bowing servant roles afforded them in the years prior to that, one can understand and even tolerate a similar degree of ignorance perpetrated against gwailos in Hong Kong cinema of the same era, and perhaps lasting a bit longer. But the racist elements in DON'T GIVE A DAMN, for 1994 (!), are in remarkably poor taste, and I doubt you could find an equivalent portrayal of Asians in Hollywood product of that time. (and no, an Asian portraying a convenience store owner, a lab tech or a doctor is not inherently racist casting. Maybe a bit stereotypical, but also reflective of certain realities, and not usually meant to demean).

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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Admin on Tue Sep 20, 2011 2:11 pm


    Masterofoneinchpunch wrote:BS: was not happy about Lee Hoi-sang being in blackface in Enter The Fat Dragon; Sammo could have hired a black actor. Says he could write a book about racism in the industry. He talks about difficult sequence in Don’t Give A Damn until RM breaks him off [on purpose] [this was getting interesting; I have not seen that film, but reviews do not paint it kindly; he later seems to still be upset with Sammo about particular issues dealing with race]

    "Difficult" sequence in Don't Give a Damn? A very charming euphemism Smile . The whole thing's a shocker. When not being openly racist, it's incredibly misogynistic. I've thought about tracking it down on DVD (I had it on VHS) just because it IS quite an interesting (if horrific) glimpse at what SOMEONE thought might be acceptable in 1994 (or whenever it was made). But for what it's worth, even if you put aside the intolerance, it's still a pretty sh*t film...

    The blackfaced Lee Hoi San in Enter the Fat Dragon though doesn't bother me half as much - I would, however, be interested to find out if the casting was made through necessity or choice. Which would obviously change things if it was the latter...
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    Masterofoneinchpunch

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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Masterofoneinchpunch on Tue Sep 20, 2011 2:19 pm

    Brian T wrote:...
    Masterofoneinchpunch wrote:BS: was not happy about Lee Hoi-sang being in blackface in Enter The Fat Dragon; Sammo could have hired a black actor. Says he could write a book about racism in the industry. He talks about difficult sequence in Don’t Give A Damn until RM breaks him off [on purpose] [this was getting interesting; I have not seen that film, but reviews do not paint it kindly; he later seems to still be upset with Sammo about particular issues dealing with race]

    Hearing more about this dark side of the industry from someone like Samuels would indeed be enlightening. Some western fans have qualified (maybe even defended) the racism in Hong Kong cinema by saying it's simply OK because of how Hollywood portrayed Asians throughout the decades, etc., and granted when one thinks of, say, Mickey Rooney in BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY'S (which even Blake Edwards felt ashamed of later on), or various other bowing servant roles afforded them in the years prior to that, one can understand and even tolerate a similar degree of ignorance perpetrated against gwailos in Hong Kong cinema of the same era, and perhaps lasting a bit longer. But the racist elements in DON'T GIVE A DAMN, for 1994 (!), are in remarkably poor taste, and I doubt you could find an equivalent portrayal of Asians in Hollywood product of that time. (and no, an Asian portraying a convenience store owner, a lab tech or a doctor is not inherently racist casting. Maybe a bit stereotypical, but also reflective of certain realities, and not usually meant to demean).

    The Samuel's commentary with Meyers is worth listening to (if Samuels wrote a book I would buy it). I believe I put the most important points down though. I'll try to add some more Meyers commentaries later (of course putting them in the correct thread). I'm interested to see if the later ones have improved (I can't see how they could not). But you will notice the many mistakes he made in those early ones that lead to being quoted over and over again (like the Shaw Brothers library possibly being burnt).

    I'll try to get a review out of his latest book as well. I stopped taking notes of the errors though (one paragraph had about five, mostly dates, but I thought I have better things to do; though this book is better than his previous ones). What is interesting is that Meyers is harsher with Sammo in this latest book. I'm not sure why, but some of it might have to do with Samuels.

    The history of blackface is interesting to say the least. There are certainly varying degrees of racism with (some being benign, some being flat out horrific). Same goes for "yellowface".
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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Masterofoneinchpunch on Fri Mar 09, 2012 5:29 pm

    The Duel R0/Tai Seng

    The Making of The Duel (20.04m Cantonese & Mandarin w/English subtitles)
    China Star/Win’s Entertainment Ltd./BOB
    shows behind the scenes, actors discussing characters
    Manfred Wong: style similar to The Storm Riders; also throwback
    Andy Lau, Vicky Zhao Wei, Kristy Yeung Kung-yu, Ekin Cheng, Nick Cheung, Tin Sum, Andrew Lau, Ching Siu-tung, Wong Wun-tat (CGI Director)
    KY: third time working with Ekin Cheng (other two before this: The Storm Riders, A Man Called Hero)
    EC: “I got a wife there goes my life”; also doing not-so-good numchucks
    Damn it looks cold.
    NC: (he sings a long; hilarious to hear him sing Madonna): Dragon 9 character inspired by Luk Siu-fung’s novel.
    Planning time for the film was limited (most likely because of Mainland shooting)
    NC: Andrew Lau’s temper is well known, very serious about work.
    Ching Siu-tung: Snow’s character uses a combination of Japanese swordplay and Western fencing. Andy Lau’s “Hovering Heavenly Fairy”
    WWT: Nick’s character is for comic relief [why does he become the main character]
    AL: shooting in -13 degree Celsius, nonprofessional extras used; pretty much trouble free production.
    Chinese New Year film.
    “And Don’t Buy Bootlegs. OK?”

    Photo Gallery
    Trailers (HK Trailer 1 (2.50m), HK Trailer 2 (English dubbed; 2.50m), US Trailer (1.46m); this one is hilariously bad; love the adding of classical music)
    Coming Attractions (Trailers): Dragon Inn, Armageddon, Fist Power, Running Out of Time, Body Weapon, Deadful Melody.

    Inner Senses R0/Tai Seng
    “Making Of” Featurette (11:22m)
    Leslie Cheung and Karena Lam and Law Chi-leung
    Used a real house for shots (no electricity at beginning)
    inner cut with shots; LC and KL are staying mostly in character
    Derik Yee: “I Don’t think filmmaking is a very healthy occupation.” What he says later about actors not being able to distance themselves after the role seems a bit prophetic.
    LCL and DY go over insomnia and temporary amnesia.

    Hong Kong Trailer: 1.42m
    US Trailer: 1.25m
    Filmographies: Leslie Cheung, Karena Lam, Lo Chi Leung
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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Masterofoneinchpunch on Mon Mar 12, 2012 4:52 pm

    The Legend is Born: Ip Man (R1: Funimation)

    Making Of (13.19m Cantonese and Mandarin w/English subtitles)
    [behind the scenes footage]
    That’s not Yuen Biao’s hair.
    lots of wirework
    Dennis To (To Yue-Hong): first starring role in drama, training in Hengdian. Director wanted him to play a character like in Judo Saga.
    Cheung Wing-shing (Mandarin) concerned about accuracy. Filmed in Hengdian, Chedun, Foshan.
    Louis Fan Siu-wong (Ip Tin Chi): [says several plot spoilers and ending]
    Yuen Biao (Ng Chung So):
    Li Mei Wai: favorite scene was when she hanged herself. [um OK]
    Leung Yok-fai: Chairman of Foshan Chin Woo Athletic Association(http://www.fschinwoo.com/en/a4.htm): first time actor
    Bernice Liu Bik-yi (Kitano Yumi):
    Director?
    [annoying that people’s names are only in Chinese]

    Original Trailer 1.58m Cantonese w/ removable English subtitles
    Previews: Kamui Gaiden, The Sword with No Name, Tajomaru, The Harimaya Bridge, The Treasure Hunter, City Under Siege, Goemon, Hong Kong Connection (not a movie).

    Platform (R1: New Yorker)

    Director Interview (13.40m Mandarin w/removable English subtitles)
    January 20, 2003: Paris
    Made film to express feelings towards Dad.
    10 year period 1980-1990
    “I shot Xiao Wu in 21 days; Platoform to 60+ days”
    First filmed the autumn scenes, then 40+ days during winter; then spring
    movie is full of his experiences
    spent nights as a kid sitting silently (four people in family)
    learned to adjust radio to hear Taiwan broadcast
    80s saw rise in tape players; had nothing else growing up but music
    later half of movie electronic and break-dancing
    Around 1987 saw American film about breakdancing, watched it more than 10 times.
    learned to dance from movie. [why doesn't he dance for us?]
    Says over 300,000 pirate DVDs of this movie. Found one in Beijing
    “Every Chinese director has mixed feelings about pirate DVDs.”
    [VCDs are also heavily pirated]

    Behind the Scenes Courtesty of Mr. Shozo Ichiyama, Office Kitano 21.28m with removable English subs
    Footage shot by Ms. Fumiko Osaka
    No translating of dialog so far.
    pretty uninteresting; watch this on fast-forward if you want.
    For some reason there are chapter breaks and forwarding stops on those breaks.

    Foreign Trailer: 1.27m no subs
    Photo Gallery (23 or 24 pics)
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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Masterofoneinchpunch on Fri Sep 28, 2012 5:00 pm

    Three Kingdoms: Resurrection of a Dragon (R1: Lions Gate)

    Interviews:

    Daniel Lee – Director (12.21.m Mandarin non-removable English subs)
    Discusses length of book [note to self need to buy book]
    Zhao Zi Long is focus (Andy Lau). Character is handsome, good at MA, one of five generals. Follows his character from young to 70s.
    Had worked with all three actors before [Maggie Q and Sammo Hung in Dragon Heat, Andy Lau in A Fighter’s Blues].
    Sammo Hung (Luo Ping An) A character created for the movies.
    Maggie Q character was based on Cao Cao general Xiahou Mao (married to daughter of Cao Cao; I think he says Granddaughter in the interview)
    Interracial relations during this period (explains Maggie Q)
    Chose many non-Han for actors.
    Had to go to Northwest China for more space (Gua Zhou)
    Created Han Dynasty Style temple

    Andy Lao (8.28m Mandarin non-removable English subs) [in dress, most likely interview on set]
    A movie that uses history to explain modern life [huh?]
    Became close to Sammo Hung -> got tips from him on horseback riding and combat and acting.
    Had worked with Maggie Q on a soap opera (Magic Kitchen, script was in English; I believe he is referring to the soap opera)
    Maggie spent time on her Mandarin; he says she is well known in America, says she is only minor known for modeling in China/HK. [I'm not sure how well known she is here]
    Says the directing was the most comprehensive in career.
    Sammo taught martial arts within their abilities.
    Says Sammo is good at Nan Quan (southern boxing); good at casting large combat scenes.
    Daniel Lee has passion, good heart, clear with his goals, will listen.
    Saving son of Lord Liu Bei was hardest scene.

    Sammo Hung (7.44m Mandarin non-removable English subs) [in jean jacket]
    Never watched Three Kingdoms as a kid though had played in it as a kid.
    He liked role and suggested himself to play it.
    Says style is not too flamboyant “I’m more direct … contact!”
    “Compared to everyone else I’m more true traditional Chinese martial arts.”
    “Chinese people have a martial arts mentality. Right?”
    “I hope through Wu Shu we can incorporate all our Chinese traditions … and express them.”
    [Sammo's always good for quotes; reminds me a little of Charles Barkley]

    Maggie Q (2m English no subs) [in attire so probably on set]
    First time with Sammo.
    Had hurt back on film.

    Three Kingdoms: Resurrection of the Dragon Trailer (1.19m) English Lionsgate [red trailer]
    Also From Lionsgate (6.59m same as start up trailers): Unrivaled, Wrong Side of Town, Fireball, Wushu, Jade Warrior

    Ocean Heaven (R1: Well Go)

    DVD Intro Trailers: 1911, The Stool Pigeon and The Man From Nowhere
    37 second teaser with footage from Hero and Fearless
    2.01m trailer Mandarin w English subs non-removable.

    Making Of (11.07m Mandarin w/ removable English subs)
    Has Dir, Jet Li, Kwai Lun-mei, Wen Zhang
    Jet Li: read seventh draft, simple story, dir worked on story for 14 years
    Dir: worried and happy about getting Jet Li; “like a man who has become a mother.”
    Li: two years old lost father.
    [not much stuff here; but the movie is excellent and some of this information I used on my review of the film.]

    1911 (R1: Well Go)

    DVD Intro Trailers: Let the Bullets Fly, A Better Tomorrow (Korean), The Stool Pigeon, The Man From Nowhere

    Deleted Scenes: All burnt subs [still missing Jackie Chan love scene] A Prisoner (2.40m), Family Affair (1.46m), The Situation (1.14m), Lunch (31s), Photo Session (46s), Birthday Celebration (1.03m)

    Behind the Scenes (29.37m Mandarin, very little English, but no English subs)
    1.33 ratio; seriously you can fast forward this. A half-an-hour waste.

    Original Trailer 2.34m English/Chinese burnt subs (JC’s 100th movie)
    Trailer 55s
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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Masterofoneinchpunch on Tue Oct 23, 2012 5:26 pm

    Confucius R1/Funimation

    MAKING OF GALLERY

    Making of 1: From Chow Yun-fat to Confucius (7.10m Mandarin with removable English subs)
    Director Hu Mei: Filmed in March, cold in Beijing. He put himself into the mindset of kneeling. Chow taught himself music [they translated the instrument as a zither]. He played every note. The movie starts with Confucius as 51, the same age as Chow.
    CYF: Has never acted in this type of role before. Was his dream role.

    Making of 2: A Woman, A bosom friend (7.04m Mandarin with removable English subs)CYF, Zhou Xun and Hu Mei
    Zhou’s outfit was made of hand-strung malachite beads.
    [extra seems longer than the amount Zhou Xun was in the film]

    Making of 3: Chaotic Period of Spring and Autumn (8.41m Mandarin with removable English subs)
    Hu Mei, Mao Huaiqing
    Set covered 3000 square meter studio.
    [behind the scenes show a scene with midgets, did I miss that in the film?]
    Ceramic pot was something Confucius created? [pm me if you have this info]

    Making of 4: From Chow Yun-fat to Confucius Special Edition (7m Mandarin with removable English subs)
    Hu Mei, Executive Producer Yu Pun-hoi, Chow Yun-fat, Chen Jianbin, Zhou Xun, Yao Lu, Rachel Liu [lots of people on this one]
    CYF: Story covers from when Confucius was 53 was mayor of Zhongdu to 73 when he died.
    HM: repeats 51 age story above; says CYF is introverted [Confucius was closer or was 51 when he promoted at Zhongdu].

    Making of 5: The Politicians (7.11m Mandarin with removable English subs)
    Hu Mei, Chen Jianbin
    HM: Chen Jianbian is a contrast to Confucius, CJ created face of steel for character

    Making of 6: Animal Stars (7.43m Mandarin with removable English subs)
    Hu Mei, Chen Jianbin, Peter Pau
    Hu Mei: horses were much worse than cows; ox cart to horse was upgrade for Confucius.
    [a lot of green screen in the background]
    CJ: when feeding horse keep fingers flat [good to know so you don’t get your fingers bit]
    [NOTE TO SELF: they had problems with deer; when watch again check to see if deer are in film]

    Making of 7: Progressing in the Snow (6.25m Mandarin with removable English subs)Peter Pau, Hu Mei, Ren Quan
    PP: (On Frozen Lake): First filmed from lake, then off to Beijing Film Academy where they recreated the scene.
    The Final death scene was not actually in water [that’s pretty cool]

    Making of 8: The Warfare (7.06m Mandarin with removable English subs)
    Peter Pau [wearing shirt LHS*ME – no idea]
    PP: After main shooting, still had 2 weeks of special effect shooting.
    This shows scenes of burning stuntmen over and over [cool, though they don’t seem very good at putting them out]

    Trailers: Original Trailer (1.43m).
    Previews: City Under Siege, The Treasure Hunter, Love and Honor, The Sword With No Name, Ichi, Tajomaru, The Harimaya Bridge, Hong Kong Connection (not a movie).
    Start-Up Trailer: The Legend is Born: Ip Man.
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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Masterofoneinchpunch on Tue Jan 21, 2014 10:58 am

    Red Cliff Disc 1 Magnolia R1

    The Making of an Epic: Red Cliff (28m removable subs Mandarin w/some English)
    5 years of preparation
    almost a year of principal photography Ange[sp?] Reservoir, Hebei is where water scene took place.
    [much behind the scenes footage; lots of staff comments]
    T. Chang on John Woo “It’s no use talking to him.  He won’t listen”

    Interview with John Woo: The Carriers Flight from Concept to Creation (4.32m English no subs):
    3 main locations for shoot.

    Storyboards: around 58.
    Also From Magnolia Entertainment (trailers): The Warlords, District 13: Ultimatum, Ong Bak 2, Wonderful World, HDnet.

    Red Cliff Disc 2

    Making Red Cliff: Trials and Tribulations (25.09 Mandarin)
    [you can see John Woo anxious during this]
    Accident at fortress location [rocks fell on top of soliders; I do not believe this is where the fatality happened]
    Weather is tough; Up to 104F on location.
    [I’ve never seen so many people upset with a baby]
    “you guys slap him a few times”[yes this is a direct quote]
    [A couple of glitches around 21.20 of this]

    HDNet: A look at Red Cliff (4.35m)
    John Woo subtitled even though he spoke English.
    Wanted to make this for 20 years.
    He wanted to show strong woman characters.

    The Great Magician R1 Well Go

    Trailers at beginning: Dangerous Liaisons, Tai Chi Zero, Let The Bullets Fly
    Previews: Dangerous Liaisons, Tai Chi Zero, Let The Bullets Fly
    Subtitles: English
    Audio: Mandarin (5.1, 2.0 Dolby Digital), English (5.1, 2.0 Dolby Digital)
    Extras: Making The Magic (37:52m) w removable English subs in Mandarin
    [behind the scenes, interviews]
    TL: TL and Lau Ching-wan did TV Police Cadet and The Grand Canal and films Doctor Mack and The Longest Nite.
    Author Zhang Haifan was thinking of TL.
    [TL sounds dubbed for his Mandarin]
    Zhou Zun gave Dir DVDs of The Equation of Love and Death (2008) and Trouble Makers (? Wu Gang is apparently in it with Zhou Zun)
    TL apologizes for Putonghua (Mandarin) dialect
    Dir Derek Yee: wanted to make happy film.  Felt pressures for populace in China like HK.
    LGW: first time speaking Putonghua
    Early 1910s
    Butler Liu is Liu Kun-shan
    Wu Gang: BL: second time on a wire
    DY: wants the audience to feel at ease and happy
    [lots of green screen]
    Kong Tao-hoi is magic consultant [interviewed]
    [behind the scene on the warlord table scene is interesting with writer being an actor and you can see Tsui Hark act as well]
    Tsui Hark: last film should be Final Victory; says he is terrified on camera. Imitating Derek Yee for role.
    Trailer (53s) [not a particularly good trailer]
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    Masterofoneinchpunch

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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Masterofoneinchpunch on Tue Jan 21, 2014 11:13 am

    Bunohan: Return to Murder R1 Oscillscope

    Trailers at beginning: A variety of films from Oscillscope.

    Making of Bunohan (19:27m) English with burnt Malay and English subtitles
    Dain Said [speaks English]: real town called Bunohan
    Faizal Hussein (Ilham: Eldest brother):
    Zahiril Adzim (Adil Bunga Lalang): character from Kelantan
    Pekin Ibrahim (Bakar): says character is unlike him [I hope so]
    Bront Palarae (Deng)
    FH: Pok Eng is a shadow puppet master, wife Mek Yah was a Mak Yong had son Illham, Pok marries Mek Ani had son Bakar, grew apart he goes back to Mek Yah .
    DS: Bakar is real shadow puppet master.
    Using Kelantanese dialect
    Amerul Affendi (Muski), Carliff Carleel (Chart) speaks English, Mat Seman (Bakri)
    FH: Lawl Ayam is the knife he used.
    DS: no guns in film.
    Tengku Azura (Mek Yah): character 50 years old like crocodile [speaks some English], is a model.
    In Conversation, with Dain Said and Acclaimed Dramatist Huzir Sulaiman (31:20m) English
    [I would have loved to hear more about Said’s influences instead of just what Huzir sees into the film]
    DS: moved around a lot as a kid including London (26 years in England; which is why he has his accent).
    Grew up in small town environment; shadow puppet,
    Talks of lost ceremony [though I think the slaughtering of the bull is a good thing lost]
    Destroy or question the mythology that the small town was a place to discover youself.
    Bakar switches Kelantanese (the main language in the film) to Malay in one scene.
    [talks throughout of themes of identity, landscape]
    Everything is shifting except for the mangroves.  
    Pattern in the boxes (open spaces versus closed, boxing ring is a box, containment)
    Relationship to men.  Why do they go the way they go (homosocial relations)?
    Possibly explores his own relationship with his dad.
    Is not making a film that he wishes his dad would have seen.
    Role of mother was something that influenced the main mother character.
    Original Theatrical Trailer (59s) [too fast paced for what the movie actually is]

    This Girl is Badass R1 Magnet

    Trailers at beginning: The Sorcerer and the White Snake, John Dies at the End, The ABCs of Death, The Brass Teapot, axs.tv
    Audio: 5.1 Thai Dolby Digital, 5.1 English Dolby Digital
    Subtitles: English, English Narrative, English SDH, Spanish, None

    The Making of This Girl is Badass (7.02m ) Thai w/removable English subs
    Dir: Though about this after watching Chocolate and Raging Phoenix
    Yanin Vismitananda:
    Dir: she is a teenager.  Thinks this is the biggest speaking role she has had.
    Others that are shown: Arkhom Preedakul (Samureng), Athit Amornvej (Pong), Boriboon Chanruang (Naew), Chalermsak Yamkamung (Duan),
    [improvision was used by several in the film]
    Behind the Scenes (1.57m) Thai w/removable English subs
    [not much too this; short to a rock beat]
    International Trailer (2:35) Thai  w/removable English subs
    [some scenes in here are not in this DVD]
    Also From Magnolia Home Entertainment: Same as Trailers at beginning.[/b]
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    Masterofoneinchpunch

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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Masterofoneinchpunch on Tue Jan 21, 2014 11:27 am

    Ip Man The Final Fight (R1 Well Go)

    Trailers at beginning: Various Well Go, Iceman, Special ID, Wrath of Vajra (last three part of Previews a well)
    Bonus: Making Of: (9:13m; Cantonese, Mandarin w/removable English captions)
    Checkley Sin [I hate when they do not have the person’s name], Eric Tsang, Anthony Wong, wife (), Jenny (), Tang Shing () a few others.\
    [short segments; much of this is repeated from the interviews]
    Disagreement between Ip Man and Ng Chung
    Eric’s Master was Lau Kar-leung (was cast because of MA background)
    March 28 The Master’s Finale
    Anthony worked on learning Wing Chun for almost a year.
    Fight scene between Eric and Anthony took over 10 hours (shot over two days); no body doubles.
    [antagonist Hung Yan-yan]
    50s, 60s Hong Kong; Nathan Road.

    Interviews (20:49m Cantonese w/removable English subs)
    Checkley Sin (Producer):
    Wanted to reveal lesser known facts about Ip Man.
    Transferred master into common man.
    Says Anthony had most realistic performance of all actors portraying Ip Man.
    Talks about Marvel Chow.
    Marvel Chow (Wang Dong):
    Liu Kai-chi (Lee Yiu-wah): Ip Man’s best friend.
    Eric Tsang (Ng Chung): mentions that no stuntmen between fight between him and Anthony
    Li Chung-chi (Action Choreographer): talks about pole segment and other fight scenes.
    Xiong Xin-xin (Local Dragon):  
    Wong Cho-lam (Blind Chan):  
    Anita Yuen (Cheung Wing-sing): Ip Man’s wife talks of practical relationship
    Gillian Chung (Chan Sei-mui: Dim sum waitress): character like Japanese comics and kung fu.
    Jordan Chan (Tang Shing): Rolex status symbol with cops and triads during 50s [tries English cursing]
    Anthony Wong (Ip Man): compliments set [set was good]; actual usable buildings.
    (Kurt Cobain shirt on director; also The Beatles, AC/DC)
    Says director has changed; more detail oriented instead of being too fast

    US Trailer (1:44m); International Trailer (2:06m)
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    Masterofoneinchpunch

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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Masterofoneinchpunch on Tue Jan 21, 2014 11:37 am

    Dragon (R1)

    Trailers at beginning: the Details, Django Unchained, ? [need to check]

    Bonus
    The Making of Dragon (22:26m Mandarin, some English w English subs)
    Lots of behind footage; split into chapters you can choose separately if you want.
    Actor Shows finger cut (middle finger; cool pic)
    Donnie Yen talking
    Kenji shows up injured
    (Peter Chan talking) Filming at 500 frames per second in some fight scenes.
    Discussing One-Armed Swordman, reason they picked Wang Yu for role (Xi Zhongwen influenced director); Donnie Yen says that it was the first kung fu film he saw as a kid.
    Wang Yu talking [good they got him; he had a stroke a little after filming was complete]
    WY: never given up kung fu; exercises every day for an hour and a half.
    Takeshi Kaneshiro
    PC: his weakness is that he gets sucked into his own logic.
    TK uses Sichuan dialect for character
    13m
    Tientu? Shanzhong (position at the pole of the body) (acupuncturist is talking)
    Tang Wei (Ayu) speaks
    Tang Wei reminds Peter Chan of Popeye’s girlfriend [you have to hear his description of her]
    TW: first role as countryside girl.
    Kara Hui: never worked with Peter Chan before.

    Featurettes with Donnie Yen (5:40m English w/ removable English subs)
    Basically three action scenes; favorite is the middle series.
    Rooftop was inspired by Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon.
    Yuen Wo-ping was person who discovered him.
    “shooting the action is a lot more important than choreographing the action.”
    No wirework on rooftop.
    Dead cows; stuntmen hiding underneath.
    One Armed Swordsmen concepts brought in before actual production. Tribute to Wang Yu.
    A lot of it was a real village; hired real villagers.

    “Lost in Jianghu” Music Video (5:14m Mandarin with removable English subs)Written/Composed/Performed by Dou Wei
    MTV Director Xiao Hong


    Last edited by Masterofoneinchpunch on Tue Jun 03, 2014 4:54 pm; edited 1 time in total
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    Masterofoneinchpunch

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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Masterofoneinchpunch on Tue Feb 04, 2014 1:43 pm

    Brian, forgot to post this here:

    Along Comes The Tiger (1977: Taiwan: Rarescope): commentary by Toby Russell, Wang Tao

    Can’t always follow what Toby Russell states [sounds a bit garbled] I might want to go over this commentary again. I’m writing this used on notes I took when this release came out (2006).
    Finished film in 22 days.
    Wang Tao never wanted to produce another film again.
    No notes for Tommy Lee’s fighting (Gam Ming).
    Wu Ma was also shooting another film angering Wang Tao, stating again he did not like being producer. [not sure which film this would have been, Wu did a few that year]
    Wu Ma would drink on set.
    Several girls used were models.
    No regulation shooting with kids
    Wang Tao understand 60 percent of Cantonese
    Says Jackie Chan was doing stunts in Hong Kong at this time.
    Like HK martial art directors better than Taiwan.
    Tommy Lee had outside problems.
    Film did OK when released; Wang Tao put up money for it.
    Shot a few scenes in Korea.
    Loves Once Upon A Time In The West (which this is partially based on)
    Tommy Lee left to HK then to USA to cook.

    NOTE: This is OOP and one of the few films you should pick up from Rarescope. Quality-wise it is their best release. It is not one of their best films though. It really helped getting Wang Tao to not only help with the commentary, but get the best possible copy as well.
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    Brian T

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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Brian T on Tue Feb 04, 2014 1:49 pm

    Thanks. Even if I can't find it, or can't afford it if I do, at least your notes are here for posterity. I have about eight or nine Rarescope discs tucked away. I should probably double check at some point -- I may already have it!  Laughing 
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    Masterofoneinchpunch

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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Masterofoneinchpunch on Fri May 23, 2014 3:20 pm

    Shout Factory’s Hapkido/Lady Whirlwind R1

    Interview with Angela Mao (16:56m) Mandarin with subs, English without
    [appears to take place in restaurant; no idea of date of interview]
    Got third degree black belt in Hapkido.
    Learning Hong Quan and Yong Quan in HK (she wasn’t as serious with this as Hapkido)
    In Korea would film during day and “three of us” would train with master at night.
    Never got in “real fight”. Apparently was living at Golden Harvest. Talks about disrupting potential robber (got reported on TV).
    Some Bruce Lee talk. She liked him and says he was good and polite to people.
    On Dramas: made film with Polly Shang-kwan and Sam Hsu (Back Alley Princess)
    On leaving GH: She signed five-year contract went back to Taiwan to develop career.
    On The Himalayan: went to Nepal to film. One of her favorites.
    Broken Oath: filmed during end of 1975 into 1976.
    Filming Thunderstruck had to flip on long table dislocated waist into side of table.
    Dance of Death: JC was martial arts choreographer for the important parts including ending. Known JC for 20 years [this might give a date on the interview]
    HK vs. Taiwan movies: [waffling here]
    Favourite Films: Hapkido, The Fate of Lee Khan, The Himalayan.
    Shaw Brothers once talked to her about being in their films, but was in contract with GH.
    Likes Peking Opera better than movies (her participation I believe.)
    60 guys and 40 girls in her Peking Opera class.
    Student at Fuhsing Academy admired Ivy Ling.
    Golden Harvest gave her English name. GH was doing auditions in Taiwan.

    Interview with Carter Wong (16:59m) English without subs
    [also appears to take place in restaurant; no idea of date of interview]
    Started MA 8 or 9 in Macao
    Open schools of MA, taught Boy Scouts, taught police before movies.
    [gets year wrong he actually starts movies in 1972]
    When young friends with Bruce Lee’s brother.
    18 Bronzemen (1976) talk (helps with choreography in film; he is uncredited) also Joseph Kuo talk.
    Move to New York in 1984 and teach state police.
    Talks about Hollywood casting. Almost did Year of the Dragon except could not because of being newly arrived visa issue. Then his part in Big Trouble in Little China.
    Talks about potential new movie in Hollywood, but since he does not name it I can’t date this interview.
    Rambo III talk.
    Interview conducted by Rainer Czech

    Interview with Sammo Hung and Yuen Biao (9:19m) Sammo is English, Yuen does some English but is subtitled for the rest.
    [date?; Sammo has pony tail and YB has front chipped tooth]
    SH: rambunctious kid who ended up in Peking Opera
    YB: also hated school ended up in Peking Opera
    YB: talks about fight between JC, SH and himself over 20 cents. Sammo won fight.
    YB: Yuen Hwa was best at somersaults. My specialty was any kind of movement ins mall spaces.
    YB: likes himself in The Prodigal Son and especially Kid From Tibet which is his favorite.
    Interview by Rick Baker and Toby Russell

    Lady Whirlwind Trailers (4:29m) [Deep Thrust – seriously]
    LadyWhirlwind: English Opening Titles (1:32m)
    Also From Shout Factory (trailers): The Big Boss, Fist of Fury, Way of the Dragon, Game of Death, Police Story, Police Story 2, Crime Story, The Protector
    Hapkido TV Spots and Trailers (7:46m) [the English trailers are hilarious]
    Hapkido: English Opening Titles (1:44m)
    Audio (2.0 Dolby Digital Mandarin and English Stereo) on both (cover says 5.1 for both on Hapkido)
    Anamorphic Widescreen 2:35:1
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    Masterofoneinchpunch

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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Masterofoneinchpunch on Tue Jun 03, 2014 4:53 pm

    Special ID R1 Well Go
    Trailers at start: generic Well Go advert feat several films, (6:18m for rest; this is also Previews) Iceman, The Suspect, The Wrath of Vijra
    Making of: (4.04m Mandarin with removable English subtitles)
    [this is really in two parts – 1) Ultimate Combat – Criminal Underworld 2) Extreme Driving]
    Donnie Yen: first added Brazillian Jujitsu and MMA to SPL, then Flash Point.  Mixes styles including SWAT techniques. “I’ve never played a hoodlum before.” [well technically you are not one here]
    2nd part: choreographer says they use mostly real scenes.
    Trailer (1:33m)

    Muay Thai Giant R1 Magnet
    Trailers at start: Black Death, Vanishing on 7th Street, Rubber, Four Lions, HD Net

    The Making of Muay Thai Giant (6:51m Thai and English with removable English subs, some burnt in Thai subs)
    Nonthakorn Thaveesuk: got idea from The Protector (Nathan Jones0
    NT: NJ character on vacation in Pattaya.
    NT: Had NJ eat sumtum before destruction scene. In another scene stuntman beat the crap out of NJ because NJ and NT wanted it to look real.  NJ even paid the stuntman extra.
    Nathan Jones: more like this character in real life than in other films.
    Sasisa Jindamanee (Dokya), Nawarat Techaratanaprasert (Katen): (character talk)
    Panna Rittikrai: wanted wrestling to be used as action not in ring.
    Prachya Pinkaew:

    Behind the Scenes of Muay Thai Giant (9:07m Thai with removable English subs)
    NJ looks at ease. [I wonder why they always wanted him shirtless]
    NJ’s back is battered and bruised after scene.
    The slap from Nathan is nasty; hurts stuntman.
    Shows NJ hurt, not sure what caused it.

    International Trailer (2:48m Thai/English with removable English subs)
    Also From Magnolia Home Entertainment (10:13m) same as trailers at start.
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    Masterofoneinchpunch

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    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

    Post  Masterofoneinchpunch on Thu Jun 26, 2014 4:27 pm

    Journey to the West R1 Magnet
    Trailers at start (5:52): The Protector 2, Stage Fright, Alan Partridge; chideo commercial (1:14), axstv (0:31m)

    Audio:  Mandarin 5.1, English 5.1.
    Subtitles: English (three kinds), Spanish, French.
    Behind the Scenes Featurettes (six parts: Mandarin, English subs): At least you get to see Stephen Chow in these.  Mostly behind the scenes with several small interviews including Wen Zheng, Huang Bo, Shu Qi, Show Luo, Chrissie Chau, Lee Sheung-ching.  Not much gleaned from this.  
    Stunts & Special Effects (1:42)
    Cast & Characters (2:25)
    Director Stephen Chow (2:40)
    The Laughs (2:21)
    Production Design (1:21)
    Choreography (1:46)

    Theatrical Trailer (2:09m English Magnet trailer)
    Also from Magnolia Home Entertainment (same as trailers at start)

    Sponsored content

    Re: Commentaries and/or Supplemental Reviews

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